Sunday, 13 May 2018

Inflammation, not Cholesterol, Is a Cause of Chronic Disease

[just published in "Nutrients"]


Department of Biological Sciences, University of Limerick, V94 T9PX Limerick, Ireland
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 23 April 2018 / Revised: 3 May 2018 / Accepted: 9 May 2018 / Published: 12 May 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Cholesterol:Is It Related to Chronic Disease)

  

Abstract

Since the Seven Countries Study, dietary cholesterol and the levels of serum cholesterol in relation to the development of chronic diseases have been somewhat demonised. However, the principles of the Mediterranean diet and relevant data linked to the examples of people living in the five blue zones demonstrate that the key to longevity and the prevention of chronic disease development is not the reduction of dietary or serum cholesterol but the control of systemic inflammation. In this review, we present all the relevant data that supports the view that it is inflammation induced by several factors, such as platelet-activating factor (PAF), that leads to the onset of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) rather than serum cholesterol. The key to reducing the incidence of CVD is to control the activities of PAF and other inflammatory mediators via diet, exercise, and healthy lifestyle choices. The relevant studies and data supporting these views are discussed in this review. View Full-Text
 
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in this paper, we challenge the current medical status quo that supports the use of statins to reduce cholesterol
We present a different view, a view that is supported by strong Science. 
In this view, chronic diseases are NOT caused by cholesterol!
In fact, cholesterol plays a minor (if any!) role. 
We explain that inflammation is the cause of chronic diseases (e.g. CVDs, cancer, diabetes etc).
We conclude with these words...
Nature has provided us with a wide range of dietary weapons, which, if appropriately combined in dietary patterns such as the Med-diet, can beneficially contribute to improving our quality of life, health, and life expectancy by equilibrating the inflammatory milieu to normal levels and thus preventively reducing the risk of inflammation-related chronic disorders. Let us not forget the words of Hippocrates of Kos (460-377 BC), who is universally recognised as the father of modern medicine: “Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food”.  
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